The Roundup vol. 3

It’s been about six almost since I last did a Roundup, which means I have tonsss of content to share. Summer is often the time when things calm down – shows go on hiatus, it’s too hot to cook – but I’ve found myself with so much to do that I’ve been too busy to even pull together all my many recommendations. For more, check out: Vol. 2 and Vol. 1 (which also links to the 14 previous Roundup posts, before I started calling them Roundups).

Activities

  • Cooking/Recipes:
    • I’m hoping to make my own summer rolls (with a good dipping sauce, obviously). Rice paper intimidates me so we’ll see.
    • We’ve had an insane heat wave so I love all recipes that require zero heat. When you’ve got a carnivore in the house, that can get tough so I’m thinking I may need to make these antipasto lettuce cups – meat without the heat!
  • Other Activities:
    • The Analog City: NYC B.C. (Before Computers) exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York is a fun journey through technology. I loved that it was interactive and giggled as I watched different generations experience it – seeing young children utterly confused by the telephones I grew up with was both depressing and cute.
    • Apple/pumpkin picking is great, but I think of fall as being perfect for farmers markets and outdoor fairs. Hit up San Gennaro or other such festivals to feel extra seasonal.

Content

  • Books:
    • It may no longer be May, but I didn’t even know May was Jewish-American Heritage month so there’s that. Books about the Jewish-American experience are cool any month of the year and this list is a nice roundup. I’ve already added those that I haven’t read to my TBR.
    • @jordys.book.club is a great bookstagram account that’s been offering mini reviews and great, snackable reccommendations across all sorts of genres.
    • Rivals, the third book in the American Royals YA series is out and as cute as the first two.
  • Movies:
    • The Eyes of Tammy Faye: Tammy Faye Bakker had an iconic, over the top look that mirrored the life she began to lead as a televangelism magnate. I remember the images of her crying on camera as her husband (and their business) went down in flames amidst fraud charges and really enjoyed seeing everything that led up to that point. (HBO Max)
    • Senior Year: Predictably adorable (and funny) movie about a queen bee cheerleader who wakes up from a 20-year coma and decides to go back to high school and take back her crown. (Netflix)
    • The Fallout: The emotional aftermath of a school shooting. I haven’t watched this one yet, but [while I anticipate it will be a difficult viewing] I think it’s an important one given the abhorrant number of school shootings we’re still seeing (119 since 2018, according to Education Week). (HBO Max)
    • Turning Red: Some parents were upset that this animated film, where a 13-year-old boy-band-obessed girl turns into a giant red panda anytime shes emotional, is a metaphor for puberty. I actually think it’s a great way to introduce kids to the topic, has a nice message about friendship, and would be beneficial for young boys to see as well. Very cute, IMO. (Disney+)
    • Fire Island: Loosely based on Pride and Prejudice, this is a queer rom com for all. (Hulu)
    • Licorice Pizza: While this coming of age film about growing up Hollywood-adjacent in the 70s is a work of fiction, much is inspired by real life people/events. I didn’t love the ending, but I did really enjoy the sticky summer 1970s vibes. (Prime)
  • TV:
    • Old Enough!: This is the most adorable (and short) series about tiny tots in Japan experiencing the rite of passage that is going on their first solo errand. (Netflix)Under the Banner of HeavenThe Beauty Queen of Jerusalem
    • Keep Sweet: Pray and Obey: Great 4-part mini series about the FLDS church and the downfall of Warren Jeffs. (Netflix)
    • Girls5eva: A girl group gets back together a couple decades later. If you’re a Tina Fey fan (e.g., Kimmy Schmidt), this one is for you. (Peacock)
    • The Bear: After his brother dies, Carmy – an NYC fine dining chef – moves back to Chicago to take over the family’s sandwich shop. (Hulu)
    • Welcome to Wrexham: Actors Ryan Reynolds and Rob McElhenney bought a Welsh soccer team and this documentary follows their real-life Ted Lasso journey. (FX/Hulu)
    • Partner Track: This show about a woman trying to climb the law firm ladder is chick lit brought to life. Sure, it’s a commentary on racism and sexism in a traditionally white male workplace, but at it’s core it’s a frothy rom com. My chief complaint is that there is no diversity showcased in the romantic leads. (Netflix)
    • Selling The OC: The Selling Sunset spinoff has all the real estate porn and drama of the original. (Netflix)
  • Podcasts:
    • Scamfluencers: Real stories of scammers and con artists. (Sample episodes: a real estate exec sells investors on a non-existant, a teenager starts a medical practice without getting a single degree, and someone who steals books that were already free.) For fans of Even The Rich.
    • Mom and Dad are Fighting: This show offers parenting advice for specific issues (from explaining death to a small child to a teen who’s pressured to smoke week) across all kiddo ages.
    • Good Kids: Another parenting pod tackling specific child-rearing topics (how to talk about racism, how to raise a reader), with most episodes under 15 minutes.
    • I’m Sorry: Comedians dissect public apologies.
    • Senior Superlatives: All the high school mems (especially the cringe-y ones)
    • Kuper Island: An 8-part series about students who attended one of Canada‚Äôs infamous residential schools that was rife with abuse and death.
    • Virtual Book Tour: Conversations with Book of the Month authors. It’s perfect for book lovers who love hearing from writers but want to avoid spoilers. Since I usually like BOTM picks, it’s no surprise I’m enjoying the conversations they’re hosting.
    • Basic! When Cable Was Cool: I grew up with cable (we had HBO – appointment viewing – and that meant FANCY), not Netflix, so I love this show where celebs discuss the history of cable tv and the shows that changed their lives.
    • Beach Too Sandy, Water Too Wet: The hosts read zero/one-star Yelp reviews. People are crazy.
    • Girls Next Level: I watched every episode of Girls Next Door, the reality tv show about Hugh Hefner and his girlfriends at the playboy mansion. The two main girlfriends, Holly and Bridget, pull back the curtain on life at the mansion and the mythical Hef. The craziest is realizing how different things were back then, from the lack of social media to the cost of designer handbags.
    • Archetypes: Meghan Markle’s podcast is obviously landing incredible guests. Together, they discuss what it’s like to be a woman slapped with a label. (Think: Too Fatt Too Slutty Too Loud)
    • Fed Up: A feud erups over Instagram over fiber diet culture.